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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
religion. there is no intrinsically religious purpose in providing disaster assistance. this provision simply recognizes that houses of worship are one aspect of community recovery. this bill helps ensure that our communities fully recover physically, emotionally, and mentally after a disaster. i urge my colleagues to join in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from west virginia reserves. the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized. mr. barletta: i wish to yield seven minutes to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. smith, who is the sponsor of this bill. mr. smith: i thank my good friend for yielding. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized for seven minutes. mr. smith: and for mr. rahall. i want to thank gracie for her co-sponsorship and leadership on this important bill. and all the co-sponsors and to our leadership for scheduling it for a vote today. this is extremely important and very timely. madam speaker, superstorm sandy inflicted unprecedented damage on communities in the northeast, inc
drowning out the voice of religion, the voice of faith. >> cardinal wool also says he thinks it's unlikely the next pope will be an american because the united states is considered the world's one great superpower. >>> a virginia family hoping and praying for the arrival of their little boy, a boy they already call their son. maxim right now lives 5,000 miles away in a russian orphanage. he's been there his entire 14 years. >> as andrea mccarren reports, he's one held hostage by an adoption ban posed last night. >> words can't describe how i feel. i told him today, max, you just cannot fathom how much we love you. >> maxim captured the hearts of diana and mill years ago when they met the boy on a church trip. they helped transform the orphanage into a better place to house children. >> no doubt at all, he's absolutely our son. >> abandoned as a baby, maxim has spent all 14 years in bleak russian orphanages. his stature may be small, but the wallens say his heart is huge. >> he had a spirit about him a lot of the children didn't have. he was smiling and happy, very curious, always wanted af
their religion is the reason they didn't bake the couple's cake. >> he believes in god, and he full heartedly does it not believe in same-sex marriage. he shouldn't have to bake a cake for. that he should be able to freely deny them without all this backlash. >> reporter: despite the protest outside, sweet cakes was open for business. supportive customers lined up out the door. >> i appreciate the fact that they're standing up for what they believe in. i want to show them support since demonstrators are not showing support. >> reporter: the owners say the backlash has been harsh but they are standing by their decision. >> it's good to know even though everybody seems to think that portland and the surrounding area is so liberal that there really is some conservative christians out there that want to get their voices heard. >> still ahead, controversy ahead of two confirmations as some lawmakers are demanding answers from president obama's picks for cia director and defense secretary regarding the attack in benghazi, libya. >>> plus, we are two days away from president obama's state of the uni
origin, religion, et cetera or you believe it's a prohibited practice like whistle blower, you can file an eeo complaint. >> i imagine you would need to use a lawyer to ge through this pro -- to go through this process. i imagine your law firm has been getting a lot of attention on these issues. what have you been hearing from the federal work force? >> we're hearing a lot of fear. we're hearing that hundreds of thousands of potential clients, federal employees and also contractors are very scared that on march 1, they're going to be out of a job, they're going to be furloughed for a month or more. frarchtionly, -- frankly, i'm here to give a wake-up call to congress because we need to solve the sequestration budget crisis before march 1. otherwise we're going to have hundreds of thousands of employees without a job. >> if you take a one day a week furlough, that's a 20% pay cut. appeals are a process you can go through. complaints are another. what does that look like? >> well, if you have an eeo complaint, if you believe you're being targeted for discrimination in the furlough, you co
discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, natural origin -- national origin. it requires notices to be posted telling you the minimum wage a few -- and you are entitled to a overtime. most are aware of the loss. if i were to ask the average person, what are your rights? they do not have a clue. they do not know what a union is mostly. as a result, workers have no result -- do not know what their rights are. the labor board proposed a new role that would require lawyers to post the notice to define your basic rights under the national relations act just as we do with the civil rights laws and the wage loss. that is being challenged. the biggest publicity that has been generated do not involve a poor decision. it was the bowling case. they decided to -- it was a boeing case. they wanted to open a plant in south carolina. they have had work stoppages. a charge was filed that they were cursing the -- kior sing sing unionan-- coer employees. the matter went before an administrative law judge. the charge was filed. he said let's issue a come plane so the administrative law judg
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
that in the industrialized world there is it a lot of people who don't stee the relevance of the religion and he wants to reenergize that faith. he started the uro faith . amms wrote a book evangelical of catholicism and calling for the church to deepen people's faith. janet? >> all right. thank you very much for the update. can you tell us about what comes next in the process? this pope had specific outreach, but what about the next one. you mentioned there may be interest in focusing on somebody to represent the different geoh, graphy. the process seems so secretive. >> i tomit give you ideas who may be in the top. it is important to understand the selection by what the church needs. if you go to the criteria and the church needs to reenergize. cardinal ravizi for culture. he's also the president of a different pontiffical commissions. he's leading the papal lenten retreat it is an honor to lead that retreat. two others had had . both went on to be the pope . cardinal schoola who is italian branch. they make up 25 percent of the cardinals and they center a big voting block . you can see cardinal ole
, religion, and politics in ll the work i do with organizations tell me. >> all right. >> we generally ask that on this show. >> it's rhythmic. that's the farthest i'll ever go. >> okay. >> rrhythmic. got it. >> not the first word that comes to mind for me. >> all right. >> wow! >> we're veering off. this is scary. >> my fault, sorry. >> thanks for asking. >> i am curious about the word, but i'll move along. >> thank you, good to have you here. >> good to see you, tony. >>> there was a time when it was common for air ships and blimps to fill the skies of america and europe. changed with one simple word -- hindenburg. more than 75 years later, bill whitaker shows where air ships could be taking off again. >>> i've never seen anything that looked like this. there isn't one. this is the only one in the world. >> reporter: it looks like a big balloon. but engineer tim kenny with worldwide aros of tustin, california, calls this the evolution of air transport. >> you can carry it inside? >> yes, the payload would be lifted from the bottom of the vehicle and stowed inside the vehicle. >> reporter
-- with criteria neutral toward religion and poses no religious favoritism. he says once fema has a program in place to aid building reairs, houses of worship should not be exempt from receiving this aid. this is all the more important given the neutral role we have seen houses of worship play without regard to religion to those afflicted in the wake of sandy and countless previous disasters. federal disaster relief aid in the form of social insurance and means of helping battered communities get them back on their feet. churches, synagogues, mosques and other houses of worship are an essential part of the recovery process. religious lib tir scholar, madam speaker, professor douglas lacoc wrote a letter endorsing h r. 5 2 writing that charitable contributions to places of worship are tax deductible, even though the tax benefits to the donor are like a matching grant from the government. these deductions have been uncontroversial because they were included without discrimination in a much broader category of all not for profit organizations devoted to charitable, educational, religious or s
fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with iraqi freedom. you're looking at a nation that can go in, with a superb military capability, which her daughter is a part of, and it can make a lot of differences, but the problem you have is that you have a political situation where we cannot sustain a long- term deployment, 12-13 years in afghanistan over the long term. it has become america's longest war. economically, you look at how that works. the big problem that i have with the drawdown is perhaps related to what your saying -- you have to be very careful about what to tell the enemy. you have to have a negotiating position that gets you from the strength
of organized religion. but i love god. start the clock now. >> reporter: because it really is a game show, there are prizes. winning teams get $20,000 each episode. but there's $100,000 for the tournament champion. all prize money, however, goes to the winning team's charity of choice. [ cheers ] >> having a baby at the age of 90, memaw. just saying. nothing's out of the realm of possibility here. >> reporter: most pastors aren't as funny as foxworthy. he assured us he's not trying to compete in that arena. he knows his limitations. >> when i started hosting "fifth grader," people certainly thought i was smarter than i was, you know. and i would say, hey, if i didn't have the cards -- the shortest show on television. and now i'm doing this and people think, well, this guy has all the spiritual answers in the world. i'm like, no, i'm still the samsame idi idiot. still two decision was drywalling, you know. >> reporter: for "today," harry smith, los angeles. >>> let's head out to the plaza and check the weather from dylan. >> good morning, lester. good morning, everyone. you're from miami?
people. there is no formal discrimination there based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or age. the only thing someone might be able to claim is there are more college graduates who are nonminority than minority and you might be able to argue there's discrimination. that's the type of thing i think a court would find perfectly appropriate. it goes on all the time. so often if i have a job that i'm really skilled in that job but i don't have the background to move to the higher position, they bring in someone i have to train to be able to do my level of work and then they get a higher salary, they get bumped up to the higher positions and i stay where i am. that's very common. unfortunately it's not illegal. the first question you ask is about state people doing federal work. so many of the federal statutes give money to the states, different welfare provisions, different unemployment compensations under the unemployment tax, which is a federal tax, but the states run those services subject to certain minimum requirements. where you work for the state formall
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)